IMG_0892 - Version 2My name is Beau Lebens. In July of 2014, I moved to Denver, Colorado, and with zero experience, decided to take up fly fishing. This is a journal of my experiences learning and (hopefully) improving my technique. I’d love to hear of your adventures or tips and tricks (via the comments), or you can get in touch.

Upper Cataract Lake, Eagle’s Nest Wilderness

I went on an overnight backpacking trip just north of Silverthorne, which involved a few lakes. You can read about the hike itself at the link above, but the fishing was pretty slow. I mainly fished at Upper Cataract (although I dropped a line in at Eaglesmeare as well), and didn’t catch a thing. The water was clear enough to be sight-fishing, but the fish I was after were not interested in my flies in the slightest. Oh well; beautiful scenery, so it’s definitely not all bad.

Blue Lakes, Mt. Sneffels Wilderness

On Day Four of my SCOUT Epic, I hiked up to Blue Lakes in the Mt. Sneffels Wilderness, and camped the night there. I got soaked on the hike, but by the middle of the afternoon things had dried out, so had a chance to try my luck fishing in Lower Lake. I should have tried on the second lake as well, which apparently is fished much less, so I’d have probably done better.

Since I’d already walked around the edges a bit, I’d seen that the fish mostly hung out where a few small streams fed into the lake. That’s where I fished, and worked my way back and forth amongst the different streams. I don’t know if I had the wrong fly, or if it was the super clear water, or just that the fish are used to people trying to catch them, but these guys were not biting. I’d cast right in front of them, and they’d lazily take a look at my fly, then just slide right past and keep feeding.

With nowhere else to be, I tried out a few different flies, and eventually got a nice, solid hit from a Rainbow. After a quick fight, I had her landed, snapped a pic and let her go again. Amazingly, she just kept on circling in the same area.

A little later on, I was chatting with another guy who was there also fishing (and who I’d passed on the trail). He had apparently caught a few, and he gave me the fly he was using, which was one that he’d tied himself, so he had a bunch of them (pictured below).

Gunnison River at Morrow Point Dam

Day Three on the SCOUT Epic had me stopping off near Cimarron (which isn’t even really a town) at the Gunnison River. There’s a huge dam there (Morrow Point Dam), and the river below that is beautiful. It runs down into Black Canyon (and the National Park sharing that name), and apparently you can take a boat tour down there if you want.

There’s a short trail along the North side of the river (accessible via footbridge), so I went down there and tried my luck for a bit. On the way there, I chatted with a Ranger for a minute, and he mentioned there was an area near the base of the footbridge where Cimarron River meets the Gunnison that he’d seen some fish rising. After going down and back on the trail, I was going to head there, but saw that a younger guy was already there. Apparently he’d been successful as well, because he had a full net of cleaned fish that he was taking home with him.

When he was done, I dropped my line in there for a while, and came up completely empty handed. Not a single nibble. I don’t know what rig he was fishing with, but my dry flies on a tenkara rod was definitely not working that day.

Deckers in the Rain

The first stop on my SCOUT Epic adventure was in Deckers, where I stopped off at a few places along Hwy 67 to wet a line, and get the trip started. I had thought I’d be able to get away with wet-wading in sandals, but the water (and the weather) was a lot colder than I’d hoped, and that turned out not to be the case.

When it started raining a bit, I decided I didn’t really want to start the whole trip off wet, so I bailed and headed on my way.

Seagull Lake, Minnesota Boundary Waters Canoe Area

On the last night of our Boundary Waters canoe trip, Brandon and I paddled out and used his spinning rig to grab two smallmouth bass in quick succession. It was pretty crazy how quickly/easily we were able to grab them.

From our main little island, we had a spit that we could walk across, to another little island/rock. Once we scrambled up there, we spotted a rock shelf where we could actually see a few fish swimming around, so we decided to come back in a canoe and drop a line in there. Within a few minutes, we’d each caught one, and we had what we needed.

That night we oiled, salt and peppered them, then wrapped them in foil and cooked them over the fire. So delicious. It also crossed 3 things off my bucket list at once:

  1. Going on a multi-night canoe-camping trip
  2. Camping on an island on a lake
  3. Eating fish I’d just caught, cooked over a campfire

Pretty hard to top that.

Jasper Lake, Minnesota Boundary Waters Canoe Area

As part of my Boundary Waters canoe trip, I took my Tenkara rig, and had a shot at fishing in the lakes there. Since I didn’t really like my chances dry-fly fishing in these big lakes, I found a little river (between 2 lakes) right near our campsite, and fished up there a bit. I didn’t catch (or see) anything, but it was a pretty beautiful place to wet a line. It was fun paddling over and getting dropped off via canoe as well.